Wednesday, October 29, 2008

Wake up call : the tipping point

Point of no return, the tipping point, radical climate changes, and the end of civilization on our planet Earth as we know it? We need to take action - well - I already think I did make my decision of being a low energy consumer back in 1973. Eat only little meat, prefer local food, recycle what you can and travel slow (train, bike, walk). Online conferencing and communication is one part of this strategy: for every telephone conference with ten people, well prepared on beforehand and then followed up by more conversations and interaction, saves this world a huge amount of energy waste. From time to time, however it IS really great to meet, listen and talk, eat laugh and hug with real people.

I read about a virtual water count principle - make the accounts of how much water really goes for the production of one cup of coffee (more that 120 litres), or a slice of beef, etc. This is of high relevance for all of us, And, same goes I think for understanding and promoting online social interaction!

I was inspired to write this post from a video by Leo Murray (that I harvested at my virtual colleague and occasional playmate, Sean Fitzgerald's blog).

I have no more time for details, but will just add this video here and go on with my work, preparing one more day of oral exams out of the house, demanding one more longish travel by train, a hotel stay etc. But that's work. Not just for fun. Hmmm.

Wake Up, Freak Out - then Get a Grip from Leo Murray on Vimeo.

Monday, October 13, 2008

Experiments in prime time

As I am trying to build up my current online presence , this blog will also need a major refreshment. Last posting was an older draft some months old that I decided to post. School experiments seem to have a popular appeal, parents as well as school teachers are engaging in the ongoing debates raised by TV2 funding several education oriented experiments. Question is, whether these apparently excellent results with a whole school introducing the Learning Styles approach, would have been so obviously successfully implemented without the cameras and special attention this raises.